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It's National Ice Cream Month!

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It's National Ice Cream Month!

On July 9th, 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed a document into public law proclaiming the month of July 1984 as “National Ice Cream Month”, and July 15th, 1984 as “National Ice Cream Day”. He recognized that ice cream brings people together during the dog days of summer and is a staple in our diet enjoyed by over 90 percent of our nation’s population. President Reagan called for all Americans to observe this day with the “appropriate ceremonies and activities.” Even though this resolution only mentioned a specific date in 1984, the celebrations have continued every year ever since. The third Sunday of July each year National Ice Cream Day rolls around, and families gather to enjoy one of their favorite past times, snacking on delicious frozen desserts from ice cream to milkshakes, sundaes, gelato, ice cream floats, and frozen yogurt.

The International Ice Cream Association encourages consumers and retailers to celebrate, and why not? The United States’ ice cream industry brings in an average of $39 billion of revenue to the national economy every year and creates more than 188,000 jobs across the entire country. According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the average American consumes roughly 23 pounds of ice cream each year. Around 87% of Americans have ice cream in their freezer waiting to be consumed as we speak. As a nation, we produce the most ice cream in the world. In 1946, Americans celebrated our victory in World War II with ice cream. That year, citizens across the country ate a total of 20 quarts of ice cream per person. Even one of our Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, had a detailed recipe for vanilla ice cream that can still be seen today in the Library of Congress.

Even though ice cream has an extensive history in the United States, we didn’t see the appearance of the ice cream cone until the St. Louis World’s Fair of 1904 where a Syrian waffle maker began rolling his pastries into a conical shape, known as a cornucopia, to help out an ice cream vendor who had run out of dishes to serve his customers. Thus began the birth of the waffle cone we all know as a classic today. The idea of using a cone to serve ice cream had been patented by the Italian baker Italo Marchiony in New York City in December of 1903, about a year earlier than the St. Louis World’s Fair, but the popularity of the idea didn’t take off until word spread about the event in St. Louis. St. Louis quickly capitalized on the success of the ice cream cone. Entrepreneurs set out to invent special baking equipment just to produce the famous World’s Fair cornucopia cones.

Here in South Florida, there’s nothing like a classic waffle cone of your favorite ice cream flavors to cool you down in the brutal heat. Here at FYI Delray, we have an assortment of desserts to satiate your appetite. From frozen snacks to ice cream, milk shakes, sundaes, gelato, frozen yogurt, and ice cream floats, we have just what you’re looking for. Do you work on Atlantic Avenue? Then stop by and enjoy special discounts and benefits just for local employees who work in Downtown Delray. If not, then pick up your V.I.P. discount card today and enjoy the benefits of 10% off every purchase and 1 free ice cream after you make 7 purchases.

Stop by FYI Delray today! We’re located in the heart of downtown Delray Beach near the Pineapple Grove Archway at 9 NE 2nd Ave. Contact us anytime, Monday-Sunday 11:30am-Midnight, at (561) 450-7402.

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The History of Ice Cream

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The History of Ice Cream

The origins of ice cream have been known to reach as far back as the second century B.C., though no specific inventor nor date of origin can be pinpointed for its discovery. Alexander the Great was known to enjoy ice and snow flavored with nectar and honey. The Bible mentions that King Solomon was fond of iced drinks during harvest time. It was also said that during the time of the Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Caesar would frequently send his runners into the mountains to retrieve snow, which was then flavored with an assortment of honey, fruit, and juices.

Over an entire millenum later, Marco Polo returns home to Italy after a trip from the Far East with a recipe that resembles what we is now known as sherbet. Historians believe that this recipe evolved into what we now know as ice cream sometime within the 16th Century. England was credited with discovering ice cream around that same time, perhaps even slightly sooner. "Cream Ice", as it was known, was a regular at the table of Charles I throughout the 17th century. The French were introducted to similar frozen dessrts in 1553 when Catherine de Medici married Henry the II of France. Around 1660 ice cream was made available to the general public. Cafe Procope was the first to intoduce a recipe blending milk, cream, butter and eggs in downtown Paris.

 

Ice Cream in America

Ice Cream was first officially documented in the New World in a letter written by Governor William Bladen in Maryland, 1744. The very first advertisement marketing ice cream appeared in the New York Gazette on May 12th, 1777, announcing that ice cream would be available “almost every day” from the confectioner Philip Lenzi. Records still intact from the era state that our first president, George Washington, spent over $200 on ice cream during the summer of 1790 in Chatham Street, New York. The inventory records taken from Mount Vernon after George Washington’s death also revealed to us “two pewter ice cream pots.” It was said that President Thomas Jefferson also had a favorite 18-step recipe for an ice cream delicacy resembling a modern-day Baked Alaska. Dolley Madison also served a magnificent strawberry ice cream creation at President James Madison’s second inaugural dinner in the White House.

Up until around 1800, ice cream remained a rare and exotic treat only enjoyed by the elite. Around that time came the invention of insulated ice houses. The manufacturing of ice cream soon became a booming industry, pioneered by a Baltimore milk dealer named Jacob Fussell in 1851. Like many other American industries, the production of cream increased because of technological innovations, including mechanical refrigeration, steam power, the homogenizer, packing machines, electric power and motors, and new freezing processes and equipment. Motorized delivery vehicles also dramatically changed the ice cream industry. The culmination of all these ongoing technological advances is that the annual production of frozen dairy in the United States reached around 1.6 billion gallons.

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All About Gelato!

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All About Gelato!

You have to hand it to the people of Italy, they deserve major kudos for all the wonderful culinary creations they’ve brought into the world. From pizza and pasta to pesto and marinara sauce, many of the things we enjoy have roots in Italian culture. Although these dishes are wonderful, nothing instantly satisfies the palate on a hot summer day like a cold cup of gelato. With a history as rich as its flavor, there is a wealth of information out there on gelato and its origins. Here are a few things you probably didn’t know about gelato.

 

Congelato is the Italian Word for Frozen

The word congelato translates to frozen in Italian and congelare means to freeze. Though gelato is basically the Italian version of ice cream, it isn’t just Breyer’s with an artisanal flair. Much like ice cream, gelato contains sugar, milk, ice, and flavorings such as fruit, nuts, or caramel, but also has less air whipped into it, less cream, and no egg yolks.

 

Early Gelato Was Closer to Sorbet than Normal Ice Cream

Although gelato has its roots in Italian culture, food historians tell us that the history of ice cream begins with ancient flavored ices dating back to as early as 3000 BC.  The ancient cultures of China and Egypt added fruit and salt to snow to make a primitive cold dessert. Allegedly ancient Roman emperors ate similar desserts, and frozen treats were one of the myriad of culinary inventions brought to Paris from Florence, Italy by Catherine de Medici upon her marriage to the King of France. The lack of milk at the time meant that the Italians had to use water, making early gelato more closely resemble sorbetto, or sorbet.

 

The First Gelato Café Opened in Paris, 1686

In 1686, a Sicilian fisherman and chef from Palermo by the name of Francesco Procopio dei Coltelli made the first gelato machine. He proceeded to open up a café in Paris called Café Procope, which sold coffee and gelato to Parisians and great literary thinkers like Rousseau and Voltaire. To this day you can still visit Café Porcope, which now serves classic French dishes such as duck foie gras, beef tartare, and snails.

 

Gelato Packs More Flavor but Less Fat than Ice Cream

By some miracle straight from the divine maker him/her-self, gelato somehow contains less fat than ice cream but seems to taste more flavorful. Gelato expert Morgan Morano explains in a conversation with NPR, gelato is smoother, softer, and denser than ice cream because less air is churned into it and it has less butterfat. “Butterfat coats your palate, and if you have less of it you can taste the flavors more quickly,” explained Morano.

 

It's Warmer Temperature Packs a Stronger Flavor

Gelato is properly stored at a temperature slightly above that of ice cream. While ice cream is typically served between 0-10 degrees Fahrenheit, gelato is served at temperatures between 7-15 degrees Fahrenheit. That slight difference in temperature makes all the difference, and gives gelato its soft, silky texture that is more pleasing to your taste buds. The higher temperature also means your tongue is numbed less by the cold, allowing you to better appreciate the flavor of your gelato.

 

Just a few interesting things to consider next time you decide to go out for a nice cup or cone of gelato. Stop by anytime and check out our massive selection of gelato flavors to cool you down and satiate your palate in the Florida summer heat!

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